Wheel Lug Torquing

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 by Tire Rack Team
It's relatively easy to install a set of aftermarket wheels that are part of a Tire & Wheel Package, but one of the biggest details you'll need to pay attention to: wheel lug torquing. Believe it or not, there's an exact science to it. Proper installation requires that the wheel lug torque be set according to your vehicle's recommended specifications, so grab your owner's manuals. You should be able to find torquing details within.

And as your full-service online tire and wheel shop, Tire Rack is here to help with a few quick pointers.

For starters, make sure your threads are clean and dry. Lubricant or dirt, even oil and grease can weaken the torque values which might cause you to over-tighten the wheels. And if you over-tighten the wheels, you risk ruining the lug nut or hub, among other things.

Once your threads are clean, feel free to apply the lug hardware by hand before you finish the tightening process with a torque wrench. Be sure to follow the bolt pattern that corresponds with your vehicle.
And after your first 100 miles, you'll want to check everything out again to make sure the wheel lug torquing is still accurate.

You can read more about the torquing process in our library of wheel tech articles, and if it's the wheel you need, feel free to shop our complete collection of aftermarket wheels.

Comments on Wheel Lug Torquing

Saturday, October 15, 2011 by rich :
Need torque specs for 2010 Mazda 3 (with 2.0L) wheel lug nuts.
Tuesday, January 29, 2013 by Tony Lutes:
Need Torque values on 1999 Bounder Class A 34 ft RV, all wheels, Front and rear. Thank You for your time.
Tuesday, January 29, 2013 by Marshall @ Tire Rack:
Tony,
We service only light passenger cars and do not have those torque values. It would be best to check with the manufacturer.

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