OZ Rims Span the Spectrum

Monday, January 25, 2010 by Tire Rack Team

From polished silver finishes to red, blue and orange accents—there is, quite literally, a colorful span of O.Z. rims to choose from. And that's only part of the reason O.Z. Racing wheels stand out.

O.Z. Racing wheels have always been prominent in the light alloy wheel industry due, in part, to their strength and their beauty. A number of prestigious auto equipment and body work companies use O.Z. wheels, and they can be seen as standard equipment on a number of exclusive automobiles. And their motorsports involvement is a true testament to the fact that O.Z. Wheels never compromises when it comes to quality.

And that quality can be a part of your vehicle, thanks to Tire Rack.

Alleggerita HLT Crono HLT
 Superturismo GT Botticelli

See all O.Z. wheels.



Check out these Corvette rims.

Monday, January 25, 2010 by Tire Rack Team
To drive a Corvette is to believe in the beauty of a high performance vehicle. And at Tire Rack, we tend to think that means you'll also appreciate a beautiful set of aftermarket Corvette rims.

Like, for example, the O.Z. Racing Botticelli III wheels featured on the Z06 at right. A polished lip and bright silver finish create a winning look that complements the Corvette's existing high style. Same goes for these Corvette wheels, too:

BBS RS-GT
O.Z. Racing Alleggerita HLT
O.Z. Racing Raffaelo III

And the most beautiful aspect of aftermarket Corvette rims—they increase the performance levels of your vehicle as much as they enhance aesthetics. (Read more.)

Search for these wheels in our Upgrade Garage, and we'll show you what they look like on your Corvette. We'll also show you a selection of Corvette tires suited to your vehicle. (In case you're wondering, the Corvette above features Michelin Pilot Sport PS2 tires.)

BMW Wheels and More

Tuesday, January 19, 2010 by Tire Rack Team
Pretty cars need pretty wheels. Or, to take it from another perspective—high performance vehicles benefit from aftermarket wheels to enhance tire performance and handling. But still, they do make a car look really good. The 2009 135i Coupe below features 18" O.Z. Racing Allegerita HLT wheels in an anthracite finish. The following BMW wheels will look just as good:

ASA GT1 (Bright Silver Paint)
Breyton Race GTS-R (Black with Red Stripe)
moda MD7 (Machined with Anthracite Accent)

Now, search by vehicle in our Upgrade Garage to get a visual representation of what different BMW rims might look like on your vehicle. You'll also get the opportunity to see matching BMW tires.

And you might not want to stop there. The Upgrade Garage helps you search our entire inventory of suitable products, like BMW brake pads and BMW suspension upgrades. Are your BMW shock absorbers absorbing enough bounce? Feeling every bump in the road? New BMW shocks might be just what the doctor...or, mechanic...ordered.





Mercedes Benz Tires

Monday, December 14, 2009 by Tire Rack Team
Some vehicles use a staggered fitment (differently sized tires in the front and in the rear). Automotive manufacturers incorporate this design from the beginning to maximize performance. The 2009 Mercedes-Benz SL550 is one such vehicle, and it features the following tire sizes: 275/30ZR-20 (rear) and 245/35ZR-20 (front). We installed the Continental ContiSportContact 2, excellent Mercedes Benz tires, to further enhance the performance that Mercedes-Benz built into this vehicle. Search our inventory of Mercedes tires by vehicle and we'll help you verify if your vehicle has a staggered fitment, and then we'll help you determine what tires will work best for you.

And if you'd like, we can even help you with Mercedes wheels. This SL550 features 20" O.Z. Ultraleggera HLT wheels, but there are many more options. Enter our Upgrade Garage to see what is available for your vehicle. (Literally—the Upgrade Garage allows you to "try on" different Mercedes rims so that you know exactly how they'd make your vehicle look.)
 

OZ Wheels—The Racing Tuner System

Tuesday, December 8, 2009 by Tire Rack Team

The racing Tuner System helps us maximize wheel fitment without the limitations presented by one-piece wheels via O.Z. Racing's 3-piece OZ wheels. Tire Rack fitment specialists are able to find the ideal balance between brake clearance and lip depth, which also creates a pretty elite appearance. Many exotic car owners turn to this system to outfit their Aston Martins, Lamborghinis, Ferraris, Maseratis and Porsches—but you don't have to have an exotic car to reap the benefits of the OZ wheels, available for luxury and performance cars, too.

Though the 3-piece wheel represents quality and prestige, it's the technically correct aspect that drives the investment. Each wheel component (wheel center, inner rim section and outer rim section) is made in the same facility as F1 racing wheels, and Tire Rack has all components in-house to hand assemble your wheels and quickly ship the finished 3-piece wheel to you. (Read more.)

Search by vehicle to see which OZ wheels are right for you.

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MSW Rims: Put the "Wheel Effect" on your Vehicle.

Monday, September 28, 2009 by Tire Rack Team
MSW rims combine strength with style. Production is overseen by O.Z. Racing engineers, which means that quality is never compromised. In the Upgrade Garage, select your vehicle to see which MSW wheels fit, then click to see what they look like.

Here's a few of Tire Rack's featured MSW wheels:

   
        Type 11                 Type 12                Type 16                 Type 20

See all MSW wheels.



You say rim, I say wheel; you say tomato...

Monday, August 31, 2009 by David Horvath
One of my pet peeves is the modern usage of the term "rim"  to describe aftermarket alloy wheels.  Perhaps this is one of those long standing debates that will never be resolved but it's important to use the correct terminology when discussing parts. 

The rim is the outer barrel portion of the wheel where the tire is mounted. 

The term wheel applies to the entire assembly so anyone who says they are going to purchase some rims for their car is not using the correct terminology.

If they intend to purchase an entire assembly, they should say they are purchasing wheels, not rims.

It's a small point but it still bugs me when I hear it used incorrectly.


Perhaps looking at the origin of the word rim would help clear things up.

I believe a lot of the confusion goes back to the very early days of automotive history when it was common for cars to use something called detachable rims.  These early vehicles had wooden wheel centers much like what you would have seen on a horse drawn wagon.

yellow wheel

Mounted to the outside of the wooden center was a removable assembly made up of the steel rim, a rubber tire and a rubber inner tube.

This design was intended to make it easy to dismount the rim and tire as a complete unit.  The rim itself was secured to the wooden wheel center using retainer bolts threaded into the wood. as seen in this close-up.
rim bolt

When you got a flat tire, it was a 'simple' matter of pulling over and switching out the rim and tire assembly. Here's a nice series of vintage photos showing the process:

Here's the damaged flat tire on the steel rim. You can make out the dark rim retainers along the edge of the wooden wheel rim. These would be un-bolted with a wrench.

w

Here's a nice close-up of the rim retainers. The nut 'floated' in the seat of the retainer so they could spin freely. When tightened, they clamped the edge of the steel rim down against the wooden wheel center:

retainers

Once they were removed, the entire rim and tire assembly could be lifted off of the wooden center. 
rim removed

Then it was time to slip the new tire and rim assembly back on the wooden center. It was so easy you could wear your Sunday best coat and gloves!

repair

Many multi-piece alloy wheels are still constructed from separate rim sections and center discs like this O.Z. Racing three-piece wheel:




The centers drop into the rim sections and are bolted in place from the front of the wheel.

glove

So in reality, you purchase wheels, not rims

I want to send out a special thanks to Mr. John M. Daly for allowing me to use some  detailed photos from his website, the  E-M-F 30 Homepage.


For more info about detachable wheels and to learn about the history of the E-M-F 30, check out his organization's website:


emfauto.org/index.php


It's a wealth of information about this fascinating vehicle and its history.