How to Prepare for Your First Track Session in Four Simple Steps

Monday, March 23, 2015 by Marshall Wisler

Today is a great day to be an automotive enthusiast. Perhaps more than ever before, road courses across the country are opening their gates to any and all drivers looking to experience the thrill of driving on a track. Combine this level of access with the increased performance of today's vehicles and it's possible to have more fun than ever before for less money than you might think. 

Before embarking on your first track quest with your local SCCA chapter or car club, it is a good idea to keep a few things in mind and run through a checklist to make sure you and your car are properly prepared. Having tested products for the Tire Rack for several years, graduated from several schools and also participated in many open track events on my own time, I suggest the following:

#1 Brakes! Brakes! Brakes!

There is no higher failure rate for any vehicle system on a road course than the braking system. Factory brakes pads and fluid are not up to the task of providing stops from triple digit speeds repeatedly during a common 20-30 minute session. This is especially true for heavy, high horsepower vehicles such as many modern muscle car offerings. In short, a 4,200 lbs. Chevy Camaro SS trying to stop from 120mph will require much more braking force than a 2,500 lbs. Mazda Miata stopping from 100mph on the same straightaway. Keep in mind the braking needs of your specific vehicle when selecting aftermarket replacement products. Take a look at the offerings from Hawk, as they have a very broad market coverage. 

#2 Tires

For your first track session, I do not recommend using full-on competition tires. While competition tires are key to going fast and being competitive in class structured series racing, they aren't something I like to see used by first-time or novice track drivers. Not only are R-compound tires expensive and short on life, they also tend to have less progressive breakaway points than street tires. At the limit, these tires are more difficult to manage and can be less predictable if you find yourself in trouble. Furthermore, the high grip level of R-compound tires can easily mask weak driving fundamentals. For an introductory track driver, choose a tire from the Extreme Performance Summer category. These tires are more competitive than most Original Equipment tires and also feature compounds and patterns that hold up far better to the high heat levels generated on the track. 

#3 Understand Your Vehicle and the Way it Behaves

Most vehicles produced today are set up to understeer. This is done so that when the casual driver finds themselves in trouble, they can simply let off the gas and bring the vehicle back into a neutral state rather than fight tailout antics common with oversteer. While your tires should be making some noise if you're driving properly and quickly on a road course, it is important to listen to what they are telling you. A brief chirp or bark is to be expected under cornering or heavy braking, but if the tires are howling and begging for mercy you are wasting money and time. If you find that the car is understeering into a corner, simply have patience, relax off the gas a bit and unwind your hands gradually. If the car is not wanting to turn, turning the wheel more will not help, but rather chew away at the outside edge of your tires. Having the ability to listen to your vehicle and understand what consequences your inputs have will make your experience more enjoyable and keep your cost of consumables lower.

#4 Go Out and Enjoy Yourself

Other than the tire and brake upgrades suggested above, there is not much that needs to be done to enjoy your street car on track provided that it is in good mechanical condition. Try not to over think suspension and a whole host of other aftermarket upgrades. These items may prove useful in time, but aren't necessary for your immediate enjoyment. Learning how your car behaves in stock form also helps you plan for modifications ahead and understand the difference they will make. Try to remember that you aren't racing for a trophy or podium spot and simply enjoy the atmosphere and thrill of being on track with other cars at speed. Be competitive if possible, but safe! 

Check out our competition events and driving schools and sign up for one today!

Yokohama ADVAN Sport A/S: A Solid Ultra High Performance All-Season at a Good Price

Wednesday, March 18, 2015 by Marshall Wisler

Last year, Yokohama introduced an addition to their Ultra High Performance All-Season line-up with the ADVAN Sport A/S. Unlike previous Yokohama models, this tire features an asymmetric tread pattern that allows it to be rotated side-to-side, as well as front-to-back on non-staggered applications.

During our internal testing, the ADVAN Sport A/S held its own against some of the higher-rated tires in the field in the dry and wet. Also, we took the tire to Sweden last year to see how it handles wintry conditions. The tire offered responsive handling, but wasn't as strong as tires like the Continental ExtremeContact DWS. For a complete recap of our testing, take a look at "Testing Ultra High Performance All-Season Tires: Single-Focus Specialists or Well-Rounded Athletes?"

With a 50,000-mile treadlife warranty and a very low price-point, this tire is quickly becoming one of the categories hottest sellers. Offering broad market coverage and a long list of sizes, the Yokohama Advan Sport A/S is a good choice for consumers looking for a tire with a high-speed rating, responsive feel and more treadlife than a performance summer tire.

Bridgestone DriveGuard Run-Flat: Not Just for BMW and MINI

Thursday, March 12, 2015 by Marshall Wisler

Traditionally, run-flat tires have been used mainly for limited vehicle types as specified by certain manufacturers for Original Equipment use. Prime examples of this is are BMW 3 Series vehicles since the mid-2000s, the new MINI Cooper and all fifth-generation and newer Chevrolet Corvettes. These vehicles once represented a small portion of the market that relied on the use of run-flat tires to keep the vehicle mobile due to the lack of a spare tire and jack kit. The expectation of a run-flat tire is that it can support the weight of the vehicle without air pressure and provide extended mobility to get you to your destination without being stuck on the side of the road. 

With the introduction of the DriveGuard, Bridgestone looks to not only capture market share on this segment, but also introduce run-flat technology to markets who would have otherwise never considered it. While the DriveGuard may not ride quite as softly as a traditional tire, it has made huge advances from earlier generation run-flats in terms of its ride comfort and longevity. Given the tire's competitive price-point, attractive mileage warranty and capable all-season ability, it may be something for you to consider if you have any fear of being stranded or do not have a spare tire and wheel assembly. 

The only requirement for using a run-flat is that your vehicle must be equipped with tire pressure monitor sensors. This represents most vehicles produced in the last decade and all vehicles manufactured from 2008 and onward.

To date, the Bridgestone DriveGuard has been released in 32 sizes allowing for broad market coverage in wheel diameters from 15"-19".  

Introducing the New Bridgestone Potenza RE-71R

Tuesday, March 3, 2015 by Marshall Wisler

The Extreme Performance Summer tire market is an incredibly competitive category where manufacturers must stay on the top of their game in order to win the purchase of the consumer. Perhaps more so than in any other performance category, customers selecting from this field understand the value of a tenth of a second.

As of March 1, 2015, Bridgestone has officially rolled out its new Extreme Performance Summer tire, the Potenza RE-71R. Unlike Bridgestone's previous offering, the RE-71R features a directional tread pattern and seemingly less tread void than the Potenza RE-11 it replaces. While it's a bit early to speculate, the larger and uninterrupted tread blocks of the Potenza RE-71R may lead to faster times in the dry.

Starting with a clean-sheet approach and a virtual slick tread, all of the new design features were fine-tuned to maximize performance, traction, handling and control. The newly developed tread compound enhances grip by increasing contact with the road surface. This compound is molded into a directional design featuring a continuous center rib flanked by massive shoulders to provide a constant rubber-to-road contact that enhances steering response and cornering stability.

Testing will begin once the snow clears and we'll provide data as it becomes available.

The Best All-Terrain Tires for On-Road Use

Monday, February 23, 2015 by Marshall Wisler

Maybe you like the look of an all-terrain tire, or perhaps you may be looking for a tire with a bit more biting edge than a traditional Highway All-Season, or you might even be a driver that explores light off-road use with your truck or SUV. If you fit any one of these examples, you represent a huge portion off the On-/Off-Road All-Terrain tire market.

While some all-terrain shoppers are simply looking for the most aggressive tire for off-road use, many others are looking for a product that also has excellent street manners for the time spent on the highway or city streets. The On-/Off-Road All-Terrain market is quite vast and features a wide array of products designed for different types of drivers.

Before purchasing the most aggressive looking tire you can get your hands on, remember that tires with large amounts of spacing between their tread blocks can become quite noisy at speed and tend not to wear quite as well as their more subtle counterparts. If you're looking for a more subtle option, take a look at the Firestone Destination A/T and Michelin LTX A/T 2. While both of these tires are classified as On-/Off-Road All-Terrain tires and have more biting edges than a Highway All-Season, they take a more modest approach and make a good amount of sense for a consumer looking for a mix of off-road performance and daily livability. These tires may not win you a podium spot at a rock crawling competition, but they will serve you well day in and day out; and for that reason they have been longtime favorites in our consumer surveys.

Where Do I Get My Tires Installed?

Friday, February 6, 2015 by Marshall Wisler

Tire Rack is a mail order company that ships products from their Indiana, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Louisiana, Nevada and Colorado distribution centers. Regardless of where you might be located, standard ground shipping can typically have our products delivered in just 1-2 business days.

When purchasing a Tire & Wheel Package, your items will come mounted and balanced and ready to install at your home. However, if you're purchasing tires to be used on your existing wheels (the most common type of purchase), you will need to choose someone locally to perform the mount and balance. 

While you are not required to ship them to one of our preferred partners, Tire Rack has built a large network of installers that can install your tires for predetermined rates. These Recommended Installers can be seen during the checkout procedure or by viewing them directly on our site. 

All of our Recommended Installers are carefully screened to ensure they have the right equipment and experience to satisfactorily serve our customers. In fact, to be come a Recommended Installer a company must:

  1. Use proper mounting and balancing equipment including touchless or rim clamp, European-style tire changers and high-speed computer spin balancers.
  2. Employ properly trained technicians capable of safely performing damage-free installations.
  3. Be an automotive business that can offer additional services to customers (alignments, complete repairs, auto detailing, etc.)
  4. Possess a positive attitude and the ability to treat Tire Rack's customers with the highest level of professional courtesy.

For a list of recommended partners and their installation rates, take a look at our Recommended Installer program. 

Continental TrueContact: A Competitive High Mileage Option

Monday, January 26, 2015 by Marshall Wisler

The Standard Touring All-Season tire market is a competitive place filled with multiple options from many reputable manufacturers. Traditionally featuring speed ratings of S and T, the goal of a Standard Touring All-Season tire is not to provide the most crisp handling or on-center feel, but rather to provide good all-season traction, a quiet and comfortable ride and long life. Make no mistake, tires in this performance category will not set any track records, however they will be one of the more practical items to choose from.

Earlier this year, Continental released the TrueContact and it features a 90,000-mile treadlife warranty, and thus far, has proved to be very popular with consumers. Featuring good all-season traction and having done well in our internal testing, the TrueContact has been a very strong seller and adds to Continental’s great all-season line-up. This is a tire that meets all the criteria of a good all-season option and slots itself into the mid-price point segment in many popular sizes.

Take a look at what some customers are saying about their experience with the Continental TrueContact:

"I love this tire and what a great tire for the price. My Subie feels well planted and secure with these tires. They are excellent on wet and dry surfaces, and absorb road imperfections exceptionally well." -- Tire Rack Consumer Review, 2015 Subaru Forester 2.5i Limited

"Tire does everything claimed and then some: traction, quietness, comfort, directional response and enhancement, smoothness -- you name it! This is the most remarkable tire I have owned!" -- Tire Rack Consumer Review, 2011 Honda Odyssey EX-L

Shop by vehicle to view all options available for your application.

Best Tire Choices for the 1999-2005 Honda Odyssey

Monday, January 19, 2015 by Marshall Wisler

The Honda Odyssey is one of the most popular minivans on the road today, while having a reputation for not being easy on its tires. Due to the weight of the vehicle and the way its suspension is set up, many Honda Odyssey owners are disappointed with the wear rate of their factory Original Equipment tires. 

When searching for replacement tire options for the Honda Odyssey, take a look at the General AltiMAX RT43 and Continental TrueContact.


General AltiMAX RT43

Continental TrueContact


The General AltiMAX RT43 is popular with consumers and is currently the highest rated tire in the Standard Touring All-Season performance category. It features a 75,000-mile warranty, good all-season capability and offers a very quiet ride. Drivers often find that this tire is also one of the most cost-effective options available and that its value is hard to beat. 

Continental's TrueContact, much like the General AltiMAX RT43, is very well liked by consumers. It features an extremely high 90,000-mile warranty and also works very well in all seasons, including light snow conditions. While slightly more expensive than the General AltiMAX RT43, the tire is popular due to its 800 treadwear rating. 

Both tires are available in most popular sizes for the second-generation Honda Odyssey and are excellent options available at a good price.

Michelin Premier A/S vs Michelin Defender: Which is Best?

Tuesday, January 13, 2015 by Marshall Wisler

Often times when tire manufacturers produce several popular models, loyalists of the brand are confused on which to select. On paper, both the Michelin Premier A/S and Michelin Defender do everything extremely well, however they are two completely different tires meant for two different jobs. Both tires work very well as an all-season option, are quiet and both reflect the high level of quality that Michelin tires are known for. However, there are a few key differences.

The Michelin Premier A/S with its higher speed rating and softer tread compound will have more immediate response during lane changes and sharp steering inputs. It will also maintain grip longer during hard cornering on dry pavement. In exchange for the higher levels of cornering performance, the Premier A/S has a lower treadlife warranty than the long-lasting Michelin Defender.


Michelin Premier A/S

Michelin Defender


In comparison, the Michelin Defender is all about practicality. This tire is designed to get its driver from point A to point B thousands of times over. What it lacks in dry road handling abilities it makes up for in ride comfort and long treadlife. With its 90,000-mile treadlife warranty, this tire is one of the longest-lasting tires currently on the market. This is not a tire that will set any track records, yet sets its sights on a casual consumer who doesn't consider his or herself an aggressive driver. It's important to note that the speed rating for the Michelin Defender (T for 118mph) doesn't allow it to be used on all vehicles. For example, a BMW 3 Series or Audi A4, both of which mandate an H-speed rated tire, would benefit better with the Premier A/S.

To view all options available for your application, shop by vehicle.

All-Season Tire Options for 20" Wheels Equipped on BMW X5 / X6

Wednesday, January 7, 2015 by Marshall Wisler

If you own a BMW X5 or X6 with staggered 20" wheels, you know that finding all-season tires can be extremely difficult. While many manufacturers supply us with the front size of 275/40R20, very few manufacturers produce a matching rear fitment in size 315/35R20. Currently, there are no run-flat tire options that allow for all-season driving, as every option available is meant for either dedicated summer or winter use. 

However, if you're willing to take off the run-flat tires in exchange for non-run-flat tires, two popular options exist. Manufactured by Continental, the Ultra High Performance All-Season ExtremeContact DWS, allows drivers to run one set of tires year-round. While you will lose the security of having a tire that can run while flat, many drivers report increased wear, better ride comfort and a quieter experience. This tire is a class leader in its performance category, works exceptionally well as an all-season tire and is priced attractively given its large size. 

Another option worth considering is the Michelin Latitude Tour HP. While this tire doesn't receive quite as high of a consumer review as the Continental ExtremeContact DWS, it is also a very popular option for X5 and X6 drivers willing to shed run-flat tires. While the tire doesn't have the same level of steering input and responsiveness as an Ultra High Performance All-Season, this Crossover/SUV Touring All-Season tire exchanges some performance and dry grip for increased comfort and road manners. 

Shop by vehicle to view all options for your BMW X5 or X6.

How to Prepare Your Car or Truck for Holiday Travel

Friday, December 12, 2014 by Marshall Wisler

Like winter seasons before it, this holiday season will be one of the busiest times of the year for travel. Not only will millions of Americans take to the roadways, many will do so in the most unfavorable of conditions.

Few things can dampen the holiday spirit like being stranded with a flat tire along a road in below freezing temperatures on roads that are covered in snow and ice. Before heading out for the holidays, it's a good idea to do the following:

  1. Check your tire pressure. Properly inflated tires not only increase efficiency, but also serve as a measure of protection against potholes and other road debris. Remember that tire pressure will drop roughly one psi every month and an additional psi for every 10 degrees of temperature change. Air pressure gauges only cost a few dollars and should be kept in a glove box or center console.
  2. Check the tread depth and condition of your tires. A tire's winter traction will deteriorate as tread depth diminishes and it's a good idea to begin the winter season with no less than 6/32" of remaining tread depth. Depth can be easily checked using a handheld tread depth gauge
  3. Check the condition of your spare tire. Many spare tires spend years in hiding without being inspected. Make sure it is free of cracking and is properly inflated.
  4. Check the torque of your lug nuts or bolts. Torque spec settings can be found in your owner's manual.
  5. Make sure you have a lug wrench, jack kit and any applicable lock keys accessible or stowed away in a convenient on-board compartment.

Missing something for your trip? View our accessories to help you have a safe driving experience this holiday season.

Improving an Icon: The BFGoodrich All-Terrain TA KO2

Wednesday, November 26, 2014 by Marshall Wisler

The original BFGoodrich All-Terrain TA KO revolutionized the all-terrain market. Its goal was to provide long wear and good street manners without compromising the performance that consumers look for in various extreme conditions. The tire has succeed for years and became an icon in the industry. 

With an increasing number of players in the all-terrain market and a growing level of competition, BFGoodrich sought to improve its iconic tire and provide customers with a tire that reflects the basic principles of the All-Terrain TA KO. They also wanted to enhance the tire with the latest and greatest technologies in tire development.

The new BFGoodrich All-Terrain TA KO2 features a revised tread compound that wears better than the previous model on both pavement and gravel roads. Another point of emphasis is increased sidewall strength to prevent damage during off-road excursions or encounters with road debris. The basic look of the tire was only changed slightly and now offers a bit more siping for added benefits during winter conditions. Unlike the previous generation tire, every single part number now carries with it a designation for severe snow service.

Dozen more sizes are planned for launch soon and you can search by vehicle to view if this tire is available for your application.

 

Is the Firestone Winterforce a Good Winter Tire?

Thursday, November 20, 2014 by Marshall Wisler

As one of the most economically priced winter tires available on the market, many drivers question if the Firestone Winterforce is a good fit for their vehicle. Does the tire have what it takes to compete with many of the newer generation front-runners?

While the tire isn't as soft as many Studless Ice & Snow tires, and therefore not as well suited for ice, the Winterforce features an aggressive pattern that can move its way through deep snow as well as any other winter tire. While other tires, such as the Bridgestone Blizzak line, offers a more complete package on both snow and ice traction, the Firestone Winterforce is a bargain in most sizes and will blow any all-season out of the water. Along with its slightly harder compound, comes longer treadwear, making the Winterforce a popular choice amongst consumers looking for multiple seasons worth of use.

While not the newest tire available, the Firestone Winterforce still has its place in the market and should be a tire to consider. While class-leading all-stars like the Bridgestone Blizzak WS80 and Michelin X-Ice Xi3. are two of the best tires you can purchase to handle winter conditions, the Firestone Winterforce is a great option and provides a good bang-for-your buck option.

The Most Popular Run-Flat Tire for BMW 3 Series

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 by Marshall Wisler

Earlier this year, Bridgestone introduced the DriveGuard that's designed to reshape the run-flat tire market. The tire was developed to be softer riding, longer lasting and more cost-effective than other run-flat tires currently available. DriveGuard tires are offered in many sizes and are available for many of today's popular vehicles.

One of the primary goals of the DriveGuard is to introduce run-flat tires to owners whose vehicles did not come with them originally, such as a newer model Honda Accord. While this has yet to be seen in large numbers, the Bridgestone DriveGuard has become the most popular tire sold in many run-flat sizes for the BMW 3 Series. E90/E92 chassis BMW 3 Series using 16", 17" or 18" staggered fitments all have coverage from this popular new tire. Feedback thus far has been very positive as it has been well liked by consumers. It comes with a 50,000-mile treadlife warranty and offers promising all-season traction. 

If you're in need of replacement tires and have considered ditching run-flats due to cost or the harsh ride they are typically associated with, the DriveGuard may change your mind! Shop by vehicle to see if the Bridgestone DriveGuard is available for your application.

Michelin Pilot Sport A/S Plus vs. Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3

Thursday, October 30, 2014 by Marshall Wisler

Late last year, Michelin discontinued its popular Pilot Sport A/S Plus after a successful run of several years. While the tire remained a popular seller, increasing competition in the marketplace from tires such as the Continental ExtremeContact DWS and Hankook Ventus S1 noble2 led to the creation of the new Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3. A quick glance of the tire shows the drastic revision that took place. Gone is the directional tread pattern that makes way for a far more conservative asymmetric design. Such a move allows for full rotational ability and seemingly a quieter tire.

Our internal testing showed the new Pilot Sport A/S 3 sets a benchmark when it comes to dry and wet traction in its category. The grip was excellent, and our group also praised its on-center feel and responsiveness. Like the Pilot Sport A/S Plus before it, the A/S 3 seems to struggle a bit in regards to snow traction.

If snow traction is of importance, there are better choices that reflect more balanced all-season traction. However, if you live in a fair climate where dry traction, wet traction and acceptable treadlife are your main priorities, there is none finer in the Ultra High Performance All-Season category than the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3.

 

Road Hazard Now Included with Most Tire Purchases

Friday, October 24, 2014 by Marshall Wisler

We all do a lot of driving. And, there are potholes and road debris everywhere. Chances are you could have a road hazard that leaves you with a tire in need of repair.

That's why, in order to continue to provide the best service, Tire Rack now offers our Road Hazard Protection plan with the sale of most passenger tires. Under the new plan, a tire under $410 in cost that is not an LT, trailer or competition radial is covered for two years and unlimited mileage.

Benefits of the Tire Road Hazard Protection:

  • Tire are covered for 24 months from the date of purchase or until 2/32" or less of tread remains, whichever comes first.
  • Repairs are reimbursed up to $25 per tire per occurrence.
  • Complete replacement if the tire cannot be repaired.
  • Peace of mind knowing that your tires are protected from potholes, nails, screws, and other road debris. 

View the updated Tire Road Hazard Protection conditions here.

Improve Visibility This Winter with Aquapel Glass Treatment

Tuesday, October 7, 2014 by Marshall Wisler

When it comes to safe driving this winter, don't overlook the importance a clear windshield plays. Aquapel Glass Treatment is a great way to improve safety in tough winter conditions.

Costing only $9, Aquapel Glass Treatment forms a chemical bond with your car's windshield to increase water repellency, causing it to bead and easily shed off the glass. It lasts considerably longer than conventional sprays, while improving vision in the rain, snow, day and night. Aquapel Glass Treatment also remains highly effective after months of use, including driving in the rain, snow and car washing. Once it comes time to apply a new treatment, it only takes a few minutes to treat your windshield. And once you've driving with Aquapel Glass Treatment, you won't want to drive without it again.

Benefits of Aquapel Glass Treatment:

  • Improves vision in the rain
  • Repels rain, snow and sleet
  • Easier to remove ice, snow, bugs and dirt
  • Reduces glare in the rain and at night
  • Lasts for months

When combined with a wheel or tire order, Aquapel Glass Treatment ships for free.

Best Snow Tires for Lightweight Passenger Vehicles

Tuesday, September 30, 2014 by Marshall Wisler

Cars that struggle the most with snow traction are most commonly compact cars, lightweight coupes and small sedans that lack significant weight over their drive axles. While their traction levels may never be optimal compared to heavier vehicles or those with all-wheel drive systems, the right tire can make all the difference in making it through the tough winter weather.

Given the severity of last year's winter, many are getting the jump on winter / snow tires this season and inquiring on what might be their best choice. Studless Ice & Snow tires are the most aggressive snow tires that allow for optimal grip levels without adding studs. While they may not handle as well on drive pavement compared to higher speed rated Performance Winter / Snow tires, they give lightweight vehicles the traction needed to get you where you need to go. 

Popular tires like the Bridgestone Blizzak WS80 and Michelin X-Ice Xi3 are two great options worth considering and performed well in our recent round of ice rink testing. Even though the Blizzak WS80 is Bridgestone's newest winter tire, we were able to spend some time driving on the tire earlier this year and get some feedback on how it performs. What did we think? It offers impressive snow and ice traction, and what seems like a nice evolutionary step beyond the already respected capability of its predecessor, the Blizzak WS70. For a complete recap of our initial test with the tire, read "Bridgestone Blizzak WS80 Introductory Test Report."

For a complete list of tires available for your application, shop by vehicle and view our winter selection.

Get Ready for Winter with One of This Year's Best All-Season Tires

Wednesday, September 17, 2014 by Marshall Wisler

If you live in a climate that sees occasional or frequent snowfall, but are only looking to use one set of tires year-round, your selection of an all-season tire is critical. While most tires that aren't dedicated summer performance tires perform well enough in slippery conditions to earn an "M+S" (Mud/Snow) designation, certain tires certainly work better than others.

Currently leading the pack in the Standard Touring All-Season category is the General AltiMAX RT43. This high mileage offering from General features a good amount of biting edge and receives excellent scores from consumers. It's designed to deliver impressive consumer value through even treadwear and extended treadlife. The tire also combines a quiet, comfortable ride with all-season traction.

If your car requires a higher speed rating than what a Standard Touring All-Season tire can provide, the Pirelli Cinturato P7 All Season Plus and Continental Pure Contact with EcoPlus Technology are among the strongest in the Grand Touring All-Season performance category. The Pirelli tire is ranked first and has the highest rating in the light snow traction cateogry. It also has top ratings when it comes to ice traction, and ranks second in deep snow traction. All in all, it's an all-season tire that performs well in the colder months.

Shop by vehicle to view all options available for your application.

Differences Between the Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 and WS80

Friday, September 5, 2014 by Marshall Wisler

After a few very popular years, the Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 has been discontinued and now makes way for the updated Blizzak WS80. The WS70 was always well liked for its traction on ice and packed snow and is considered by many to be one of the most pure Studless Ice & Snow tires on the market. While its strong performance on ice and snow was tough to dispute, the tire was never known for dry road performance.

As inventory begins to filter into stock, we are seeing a new WS80 that has a slightly less directional pattern, but over 20% more sipes and blocking edges than the previous generation. While many tires in higher profile sizes will retain a T-speed rating, many sizes will feature an H-speed rating that will correlate to better on-center feel and responsiveness.

Given the severity of the last winter season, we will begin our ice rink testing slightly earlier than normal and will have a full report detailing stop and start distances in the coming weeks.

While it is too early to jump to full conclusions, I would expect this tire to meet or exceed the grip levels set forth by the WS70 and improve slightly in other areas. Shop by vehicle to see if the WS80 is available for your application.