Caring for and Getting to Know Your Bridgestone Blizzaks

Friday, December 6, 2013 by Neal O'Neal

Once a winter / snow tire has been installed, you should know that the handling traits and personality of your car will feel different compared to the tires you took off. Fresh winter tires start life with deeper tread depths, a more open design and much softer compounds than your alternate set. These features help create great deep snow and ice traction, but also cause more tread squirm and reduction in steering response.

Before a tire is cured after production, a release agent called "mold release" is applied to prevent the tires from sticking in the mold. Some of this release agent is left on the tire's surface, which will result in a slight reduction of traction until worn away. Normal break-in period of a few hundred miles will wear the release agent off.                                             

The Blizzak WS, or Winter Studless line, features a dual tread compound that when viewed through a microscope, the outer Multicell compound resembles the appearance of Swiss cheese as it contains millions of uniformly distributed microscopic pores that are constantly being exposed as the tread surface wears. These pores also help wick away the thin layer of water that develops on top of icy and snow-packed roads. A Blizzak's tread compound comprises the top 55 percent of the tire's tread depth with an underlying base winter compound making up the remaining 45 percent.

The Blizzak LM, or Lamella line, is their performance winter family of snow tires. This compound features tread designs with thin sipes to form thousands of rows of snow-biting rubber. LM tires trade some ice and snow traction for higher speed capability and better steering response. These tires feature a single winter tread compound.


Bridgestone Blizzak WS70

Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32


Just like any other purpose built dedicated winter tire, the Blizzak should only be used during the winter season. Typically, Blizzaks and other snow tires should be used between late November and early April.

Create a Winter / Snow Tire & Wheel Package with the Brigestone Blizzak today to help you have the easiest winter driving experience possible!

Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 vs Blizzak DM-V1

Tuesday, November 26, 2013 by Marshall Wisler

Owners of crossover vehicles, small SUVs and even full size cars with large outside diameter tire fitments often call to ask which one of Bridgestone's popular winter / snow tires would work best for their vehicle. For many applications, there may be only one of Bridgestone's Studless Ice & Snow tires offered in a given size, however there are certainly exceptions.

For example, if you own a newer model Honda CRV which employs the use of 225/65R17 tires, you'll find two models of Blizzak tires that are suitable for your SUV. While you could purchase either and be very well suited, there are differences between them.


Bridgestone Blizzak WS70

Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V1


The Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 is designed for lighter vehicles such as small and mid-sized cars and features an extremely soft compound designed to give these vehicles every traction advantage available. The tire is also T-speed rated to provide a more responsive steering feel at speed and retain a more acceptable degree of stability when being pushed into corners. Make no mistake, T-speed rated tires will not set dry track records, however most drivers appreciate the responsiveness they offer when compared to Q-,R- and S-speed rated options.

In contrast, the Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V1 is designed for SUVs and light trucks and may wear slightly better than the WS70 when used on a heavier vehicle. The larger tread blocks and slightly less directional design will also more closely resemble that of a "truck" tire. The most negative trait of the DM-V1 is its relatively low R-speed rating. Aside from having a lower top speed of 106 mph, the DM-V1 will not handle as sharply as the T-speed rated WS70. Both make an excellent winter tire option that can handle the snow and ice winter throws at you.

To further research these two tires, take a look at our Tire Survey Results.

Best Winter / Snow Tires for 2013

Tuesday, November 26, 2013 by Gary Stanley

Which are the best winter / snow tires for 2013? The answer depends on your driving style, vehicle and the winter conditions you experience.

Studless Ice & Snow

Studless Ice & Snow tires deliver maximum snow and ice traction when conditions are the most severe. These tires will give up some dry grip and steering response compared to higher performance winter tires. Their rubber compounds have technology that keeps them soft and pliable even in subfreezing temperatures in order to give you great traction in snow and on ice. Studless snow tires have more aggressive tread patterns and often more tread depth to help them bite through the snow. 

They're available for nearly all types of vehicles, from small cars like the Smart ForTwo, all the way up to SUVs such as the Ford Expedition. Drivers who purchase these tires are typically driving in the central or northern regions of the snowbelt or higher altitudes. Studless Ice & Snow tires are also an excellent choice for new drivers and those that need extra confidence when driving in wintry conditions. Top tires in this category for 2013 include the Michelin X-Ice Xi3, Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 and Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V1

 Bridgestone Blizzak WS70
Bridgestone Blizzak WS70
 Michelin X-Ice Xi3
Michelin X-Ice Xi3
 Bridgestone Blizzak DMV-1
Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V1


Performance Winter / Snow

Performance Winter / Snow tires give up some ultimate snow and ice traction for better dry grip and faster steering response. The tread patterns on these tires aren't quite as aggressive as Studless Ice & Snow tires, and often have shallower tread depths which leads to more responsive handling. 

Tires in this category are also made for a wide variety of vehicles, from performance sedans such as the BMW 3 Series, as well as larger performance oriented crossover vehicles like the Porsche Cayenne. Drivers who purchase Performance Winter / Snow tires often drive higher performance vehicles and many drive in areas where snow is less frequent or where snow removal is very good. Despite their bias towards more performance, they still have much better snow and ice traction than a typical all-season tire. Top tires in this category include the Michelin Pilot Alpin PA4, Dunlop SP Winter Sport 4D and Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32.    

 Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32
Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32
 Michelin Pilot Alpin PA4
Michelin Pilot Alpin PA4
 Dunlop Winter Sport 4D
Dunlop SP Winter Sport 4D


For more help on selecting a winter tire from the proper performance category, take a look at "Should I Buy Performance Winter / Snow Tires or Studless Ice & Snow Tires?"

Blizzak vs X-Ice Winter Tire Recommendation for a BMW

Thursday, November 14, 2013 by Gary Stanley

As a moderator for some BMW forums, I receive many questions about these vehicles. Recently, I got the following e-mail from a BMW owner:

Gary,

I have read many of your posts regarding the topic of winter tire recommendations. I am currently looking to get a winter/snow tire for my 2009 BMW 335i w/sport package. I plan on getting four 225/45R17 tires. However, I am unsure what type of tire and brand I should buy for my area. Currently, I live in Kansas City, but I travel to Chicago about two to three times during the winter. Also, I might be moving to Chicago. I am looking for a tire that is dependable when it's the worst outside, but it's a hard decision because of the two different areas. I am currently looking at the Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 and Michelin X-Ice Xi3. What is your opinion/recommendation?

Bridgestone Blizzak WS70
Bridgestone Blizzak WS70
Michelin X-Ice Xi3
Michelin X-Ice Xi3


Since I get the opportunity to test tires at Tire Rack, I get to see what tires can do on the street, as well as in winter conditions. With many different models of winter / snow tires to test, we really get to see how each tire performs in different environments. With that in mind, here is what I recommended to the customer:

Thanks for your inquiry. Between the two, the Michelin X-Ice Xi3 has better dry grip and faster steering response for the days when there isn't snow on the roads. Bridgestone's Blizzak WS70 offers slightly better snow traction, but does not feel as stable on dry days or at highway speeds. Most drivers in your situation would lean towards the Michelin X-Ice Xi3 as the difference in snow/ice traction between the two is very small compared to the more noticeable difference in fair weather handling

You can learn about my experience with the Michelin X-Ice line of winter /snow tires by reading "My Story on Winter Tires."

Comparing the Bridgestone Blizzak WS70, LM-32 and LM-60

Thursday, November 7, 2013 by Zig Ziegler

When shopping for winter / snow tires, it's important to know whether you need a Studless Ice & Snow tire like the Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 or a Performance Winter / Snow tire like the Blizzak LM-32 or Blizzak LM-60. Tires in each performance category are designed to function differently in the winter and it's best to know the difference between the two before you decide which tire to purchase.

 Bridgestone Blizzak WS70
Bridgestone Blizzak WS70
 Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32
Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32
 Bridgestone Blizzak LM-60
Bridgestone Blizzak LM-60


Studless Ice & Snow tires, like the Blizzak WS70, are designed for the driver who wants to maximize snow and ice traction without the inconvenience of using studs. These tires were developed to meet challenging winter driving conditions around the world by delivering studded-like snow and ice traction without employing studs. They also feature pliable tread compounds molded into purposeful tread designs that trade some handling in dry and wet conditions to deliver excellent winter traction.

The Performance Winter / Snow category features the Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32 and LM-60. Tires in this category are designed for drivers who want enhanced dry road handling from their winter / snow tires and are willing to trade some snow and ice traction to get it. Performance snow tires were originally developed for winter driving on European highways where high-speed driving on clear roads must be combined with traction on snow-covered roads. The LM-32 is offered in both a standard and run-flat (RFT) version.

The Bridgestone Blizzak line of winter / snow tires is a name synonymous with the best snow and ice traction. To learn more about the Blizzak tires, read "Bridgestone Blizzak FAQs."

Top Dedicated Winter Performers to Consider

Thursday, October 31, 2013 by Neal O'Neal

Do you live in an area that sees low to moderate snowfall? Are the roads you experience in the winter typically plowed, but you still need traction in the snow? If this sounds like what winter driving is like in your region, then consider a winter tire in the Performance Winter / Snow category.

A few popular tires to consider within the category include the Bridgestone Blizzak LM-60, Blizzak LM-32 and Dunlop SP Winter Sport 3D. All three options provide similar performance when it comes to snow traction and dry road handling and cornering. When comparing very closely, the Bridgestone tires move the balance closer to the snow traction side, while the Dunlop does slightly better in dry conditions. Both brands are an ideal choice for someone who wants to retain some clear road handing and response, but also needs to get home at night before roads have been plowed.

Drivers who live in more of a rural area, or experience heavy snowfalls, should lean towards a Studless Ice & Snow tire. Two great options in the category are the Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 and Michelin X-Ice Xi3. I've noticed in my experience with both, that the added tread depth of the Blizzak helps with deep snow traction. Michelin's X-Ice Xi3 performs a little better on icy surfaces and tends to handle a bit tighter on clear roads due to the 2/32" difference in depth compared to the Blizzak.

Whether you're looking to buy Performance Winter / Snow or Studless Ice & Snow tires, it's best to order early as stock goes down throughout the fall and winter months. Ordering early when most products are still available will allow you to choose what you want to buy. Begin shopping and create your Winter / Snow Tire & Wheel Package today!

Want to Drive Your Corvette When it Gets Cold? These Tires Will Help!

Thursday, October 31, 2013 by Doc Horvath

Nearly every Corvette owner I've met will admit that while their car may not be the most practical, they feels it's the most fun to drive than any other car they've owned. Even though the current C6 came with Goodyear run-flat tires that were intended for warm temperatures only, most Corvette owners would love to take their cars out on a clear and cold day and have a little fun. To get the best results in colder weather, a few all-season options are worth considering.

If you want to maintain run-flat capabilities that the Original Equipment provides, take a look at the Bridgestone Potenza RE960AS Pole Position RFT and Michelin Pilot Sport A/S Plus ZP. In our most recent test, both tires were impressive when pushed near the limit on our test track with the Bridgestone showing best-in-class ride comfort and predictable handling on our road course. The Michelin tire showed it can retain its handling without a big sacrifice in ride quality. For a complete recap of our test, read "Testing Ultra High Performance All-Season Run-Flat Tires."


Bridgestone Potenza RE960AS Pole Position RFT

Michelin Pilot Sport A/S
Plus ZP

Continental ExtremeContact
DWS


Some drivers would like to switch from a run-flat tire to a non-run-flat, if that sounds like you, there are three strong options worth looking at: the Continental ExtremeContact DWS, Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric All-Season and new Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3. While all three provide excellent handling and added durability compared to the Original Equipment, the Continental ExtremeContact DWS has set itself apart by providing great light snow traction. In fact, the tire is currently rated number one in our survey results and has the highest marks in the following areas:

  • Hydroplaning resistance
  • Light snow traction
  • Deep snow traction
  • Ice traction
  • Ride comfort
  • Noise comfort

Whether you stick with a run-flat tire or purchase a non-run-flat design, making the switch to an all-season tire will allow you to maximize your time on the road with your beloved Corvette! 

What are the Best Winter / Snow Tires for 2013? Find Out Here!

Wednesday, October 30, 2013 by Gary Stanley

Which are the best winter / snow tires for 2013? The answer will depend on your driving style, model of vehicle and the winter conditions you experience.

Studless Ice & Snow 

Studless Ice & Snow tires deliver maximum snow and ice traction when conditions are the most severe. These tires will give up some dry grip and steering response compared to higher performance winter / snow tires. Their rubber compounds have technology that keeps them soft and pliable even in sub freezing temperatures in order to give you great winter traction. Tires in this performance category have more aggressive tread patterns and often more tread depth to help them bite through the snow. 

They are available for nearly all types of vehicles from small cars like the SmartForTwo, all the way up to full sized SUVs such as the Ford Expedition. Drivers who purchase Studless Ice & Snow tires typically drive in the central to northern regions of the snowbelt or in higher altitudes. Studless Ice & Snow tires are also an excellent choice for new drivers that need extra confidence when driving in wintry conditions. A few top choices in the category for 2013 include the Michelin X-Ice Xi3, Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 and Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V1 (for light trucks, crossovers and SUVs).

 Bridgestone Blizzak WS70
Bridgestone Blizzak WS70
 Michelin X-Ice Xi3
Michelin X-Ice Xi3
 Bridgestone Blizzak DMV-1
Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V1


Performance Winter / Snow 

Performance Winter / Snow tires give up some ultimate snow and ice traction for better dry grip and faster steering response. The tread patterns on these tires aren't quite as aggressive as Studless Ice & Snow tires and often have shallower tread depths which leads to more responsive handling. 

Tires in this performance category are made for a wide variety of vehicles, from performance sedans such as the BMW 3 Series, to larger performance vehicles like the Porsche Cayenne. Drivers who purchase performance snow tires often drive higher performance vehicles, and many drive in areas where snow is less frequent or where snow removal is very good. Despite their bias towards more performance, they still have much better snow and ice traction than an all-season tire. Some top tires in this category include the Michelin Pilot Alpin PA4, Dunlop SP Winter Sport 4D and Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32.  

 Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32
Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32
 Michelin Pilot Alpin PA4
Michelin Pilot Alpin PA4
 Dunlop Winter Sport 4D
Dunlop SP Winter Sport 4D


Are you having trouble deciding between Studless Ice & Snow and Performance Winter / Snow tires? Then take a look at "Should I Buy Performance Winter / Snow Tires or Studless Ice & Snow Tires?"

 

Which Winter Performance Category Is Right for You?

Thursday, October 10, 2013 by Cy Chowattukunnel

Are you in the blue? Then it's time to find the winter / snow tire that works best for your vehicle. In order to purchase the correct snow tire, you should decide which performance category works best for your driving style and the winter weather you experience. There are three winter performance categories: Studless Ice & Snow, Studdable Winter / Snow and Performance Winter / Snow.

Studless Ice & Snow

Tires from this category give you optimum ice and packed snow grip, but are less responsive on dry roads. The tires trade a little handling for excellent ice and snow traction. On dry roads, your vehicle will not respond as crisply or quickly to steering inputs. Studless Ice & Snow tires are available in higher profile sizes and include the following:

If you go with a Studless Ice & Snow tire, you should consider going with a narrower tire as it cuts through deeper snow better. This is especially true for a lighter car like the MINI Cooper.

Studdable Winter / Snow

Studdable Winter / Snow tires can be run studded or unstudded. When studded, they'll give good ice and packed snow grip, but will be less responsive on dry roads. When unstudded, they'll perform well in moderate and deep snow. It's important to note that the use of studded tires may be prohibited or restricted in your area, be sure to check with local authorities to confirm legality. If you're looking for the traditional security of winter tire studs for enhanced traction on ice, consider the following Studdable Winter / Snow options:

The AltiMAX Arctic is slightly better on ice and packed snow and quieter than the the Winterforce. Winterforce tires will provide more effectiveness in deeper snow.

Performance Winter / Snow

These tires will exhibit the above dry road deficiencies to a much lesser degree. If your vehicle came with summer performance tires, the Performance Winter / Snow tires will be more comparable in steering response, acceleration, grip, braking and cornering grip. They will give up some ice and packed snow grip. Tires in this category will wear slightly better compared to Studless Ice & Snow tires, especially during the early and late winter days when temperatures are a little warmer. All winter / snow tires will have more tread noise and this will vary from tire to tire. Performance Winter / Snow tires do tend to be quieter than the other performance categories.

Available in lower profile sizes, the following Performance Winter / Snow tires are great options:

Is a Studless Ice & Snow, Studdable Winter / Snow or a Performance Winter / Snow tire right for your vehicle? It depends on your car, where you live, how you drive on dry roads and how you want to balance the above compromises. For example, my brother lives in Marion, Indiana, which is about an hour northeast of Indianapolis. He got the Bridgestone Blizzak WS60 Studless Ice & Snow tire in 235/40R18 on Sport Edition A7 wheels for his 2008 BMW M3. He chose this tire because central Indiana is more apt to get ice storms and there's the potential for heavier snow that wouldn't be quickly cleared from the country roads between his offices. He's willing to drive slower on dry roads.

Compare my brother's driving situation with another driver from Louisville with the same car but a heavier foot, he would be better served with the Performance Winter / Snow Dunlop SP Winter Sport 3D tires in 235/40R18 front and 255/40R18 rear. Louisville's milder weather allows him to emphasize dry road performance, but still have emergency snow capability.

Let it snow.

 

Are All-Season Tires Enough for Winter Driving If I Have Front-Wheel Drive?

Tuesday, October 8, 2013 by Doc Horvath

As front-wheel drive cars were first marketed to the United States, one of the major selling points from the manufacturers was that traction would be enhanced by having the weight of the engine over the drive axle (especially in snow). With this in mind, many drivers feel that all-season tires on a FWD vehicle is all you need this winter. To put this statement to the test, we took two identical Honda Civics to a local hockey rink and ran them through a series of acceleration, braking and cornering tests.

We equipped one car with the Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 to represent the Studless Ice & Snow category and the other with the Bridgestone Turanza EL400-02, the Standard Touring All-Season option that has been used as Original Equipment by Honda.

Acceleration tests on the ice began with the test cars sitting with their rear tires on the goal line. Allowing the vehicle's traction control to help the driver maximize tire grip, the drivers accelerated as fast as their tires would allow and noted the time they took to cover the 60-feet distance to the center of the ice rink.

The Studless Ice & Snow tires benefited from their superior ice traction and activated the vehicle's traction control less. It only took them 4.505 seconds to complete a run, with their 1.5-second faster acceleration times representing about a 25% improvement over the all-season tire's 6.045 second run.

In a separate test, we measured the distance it took the tires to bring the car to a complete stop from 12 mph (20 km/h). The car's speed was stabilized and the driver fully applied the brakes to engage the vehicle's four-wheel disc anti-lock braking system (ABS) until the vehicle came to a complete stop. When equipped with all-season tires, the car's ABS engaged relatively easy and it took an average of 53.6 feet to stop the Civic. The Studless Ice & Snow tires provided more grip and actually squealed against the ice whenever the ABS activated, bringing the car to a stop in an average of 35.1 feet (34% improvement). Their 18.5 feet shorter stopping distance was over a car length improvement compared to the all-season tires.

To simulate turning at a slippery intersection, our team also drove each tire around a 90-degree right-hand corner marked by traffic cones that represented the outside edge of a driving lane. The Studless Ice & Snow tires offered a secure feel and reached a cornering limit of 11 mph (18 km/h) as they completed the corner without hitting any of the cones. Even with Honda's Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) active, testing showed the all-season tires could complete the corner without hitting any cones at a maximum of 8 mph (13 km/h). 

For a complete recap of our test, watch "Are Front-Wheel Drive and All-Season Tires Enough for Winter Driving?"

Michelin Takes the Pilot Sport A/S Plus and Makes it Better With the Pilot Sport A/S 3

Thursday, September 26, 2013 by Cy Chowattukunnel

Have you been tempted by great test results and feedback of the Michelin Pilot Super Sport, but need light snow traction, longer treadwear and more emphasis on lower tread noise? Sounds like you're looking for the Ultra High Performance All-Season version of the Pilot Super Sport -- the new Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3.

Michelin's internal testing shows marked improvement in dry and wet grip compared to its predecessor, the Pilot Sport A/S Plus. We've just completed our comprehensive comparison testing of the tire and the consensus is the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 beat its three main rivals, the Bridgestone Potenza RE970AS Pole Position, Continental ExtremeContact DWS and Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetrical All-Season. For a complete recap of our test, read "Testing the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 - Can It Set a New Performance Benchmark for All-Season Tires?"

What about the tire's snow traction? Michelin engineers have added biting edges in the grooves to improve snow grip and used their Helio compound to keep the compound more malleable at cold temperatures. For most drivers, especially those with milder winters, the new Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 is the optimal Ultra High Performance All-Season choice.

Michelin has gone from a directional (V-shaped) tread pattern in the Pilot Sport A/S Plus to a non-directional asymmetrical (bigger outside shoulder) tread design with the Pilot Sport A/S 3. Their engineers use a varying number of longitudinal grooves to create a tread design that will resist hydroplaning and allow for cross-rotation, leading to more even wear. 205 or narrower tires have four ribs (rows of tread blocks), 205-255 width tires have five ribs and 295-265 width tires have six ribs. In the photo below, you can see some examples of the tread design differences. Pictured from left to right are 195/55R16, 235/45R17 and 275/35R20.

Comparing the Bridgestone Blizzak LM-60 and Blizzak LM-32

Thursday, September 19, 2013 by Marshall Wisler

Earlier this year, Bridgestone announced the replacement of its popular Performance Winter / Snow tire, the Blizzak LM-60. While the Bridgestone Blizzak line has always been known for its top-of-the-class winter traction, it has given up ground recently to some models that offer competitive levels of grip, but tend to handle better on dry or wet plowed roads.

The new Bridgestone Blizzak LM-32 aims to pick up where the LM-60 left off while increasing steering response and dry road handling. Offered in numerous sizes and featuring speed ratings as high as W (168 mph), the new LM-32 should be at the top of your list if you are looking for a tire that can handle most anything winter throws at it, while still being pleasurable to drive on when conditions aren't as nasty.

Higher speed ratings traditionally correlate directly with on-center feel, lane change responsiveness and sidewall rigidity. The higher the speed rating, the better the tire typically performs under such criteria. With that said, apart from a higher terminal top speed (LM-60 is H-speed rated for 130 mph), the new LM-32 looks to be a better handling tire than its predecessor, but still retains the aggressive directional pattern the Blizzak line is known for.

To learn more about the Blizzak line from Bridgestone, read "Bridgestone Blizzak FAQs."

New Yokohama ADVAN Sport V105 Tested

Thursday, August 29, 2013 by Ben Rooney

We recently completed our test of the Yokohama ADVAN Sport V105, which will replace the previous ADVAN Sport in most sizes. We pitted it and the new Dunlop Sport Maxx RT against the current Max Performance Summer leaders, the Michelin Pilot Super Sport and Bridgestone Potenza S-04 Pole Position.

The Yokohama ADVAN Sport has been a nice tire, but it lacked the razor-edge handling feel of its predecessor the AVS Sport. It was an impressive tire in wet conditions, but in the dry it was not quite as engaging as we would normally expect from a Yokohama flagship performer.

The V105 continues the trend of strong wet traction for Yokohama in this category, while bringing back a highly responsive steering feel. It sacrifices a little bit of ride comfort compared to the Michelin and Bridgestone, but rewards the driver with precision handling and direct, immediate response.

Some highlights from our test include:

  • Best overall track rating for wet track performance, including top marks in steering response, braking modulation and handling predictability.
  • Second place in overall dry track rating, behind only the Michelin Pilot Super Sport.
  • Best stopping distance in our wet braking test.

Our test conclusion was: A very sporty tire that can hang with the best. To view our full test report, read "Testing New Max Performance Summer Tires: Can the Latest Keep Up With the Greatest?"

Best Tires for a Honda Odyssey

Friday, August 23, 2013 by Colin .

Many Honda Odyssey owners want a tire that has long treadlife, good traction and a quiet ride. When looking for tires that work best for your Odyssey, it's important to remember that different trim levels and model years use different tire sizes, therefore you'll want to verify what size your vehicle uses first. Consider the following options when it comes time for new tires on your Honda Odyssey. 

Continental ProContact with EcoPlus Technology - This Standard Touring All-Season tire is offered with an 80,000-mile treadlife warranty. It's designed to enhance driving pleasure, save fuel and provide very good all-season traction. Continental's PROactive Edge Technology brings more active edges into the contact patch to promote foul-weather traction while allowing the pattern elements to transfer smoothly from edge to edge to minimize road noise.

Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus - Designed to provide Bridgestone's ultimate in luxury, elegance and comfort, the Turanza Serenity Plus blends long wear with dry, wet and wintertime traction, even in light snow. The tire is one of the highest rated options in the Grand Touring All-Season category.

Michelin Primacy MXV4 - Like the Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus, the Primacy MXV4 also rates very well in the Grand Touring All-Season category. It's offered with a 60,000-mile treadlife warranty and excels in ride quietness and smoothness. To see how this tire performed during our testing, watch "Testing Grand Touring All-Season Tires with a Sporty Edge."


Continental ProContact with EcoPlus Technology

Bridgestone Turanza Serenity
Plus

Michelin Primacy
MXV4


Firestone Precision Touring - Available with a 70,000-mile treadlife warranty, this tire provides year-round capability and comfort. In our testing the tire was a little noisier compared to its competition, but is ranked very highly in its category. It receives high marks in the following areas:  

  • Treadwear
  • Hydroplaning resistance
  • Wet traction
  • Cornering stability
  • Dry traction
  • Steering response

General AltiMAX RT and HP - These value-priced options are strongly worth considering. The RT model comes with a 70,000-mile treadlife warranty, while the HP H-speed rated version has a 55,000-mile warranty and the V-speed rated version offers a 40,000-mile treadlife warranty. Both models combine reliability, comfort and treadlife and are a good choice for your Honda Odyssey.  

View our Tire Decision Guide to help you determine the best tires for how and where you drive your Honda Odyssey.

Great Extreme Performance Summer Tires

Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Cy Chowattukunnel

Ranking the top three quarterback in the NFL is tough. Is Aaron Rodgers, Peyton Manning or Tom Brady the best? Answers may vary across the country, but even neutral observers will be hard pressed to say who's the best.

That's how I felt after finishing our widely anticipated Extreme Performance Summer test. They're all great across the board and it's pretty hard to declare a clear number one.

BF Goodrich g-Force Rival
BFGoodrich g-Force
Rival
Dunlop Direzza Z2
Dunlop Direzza
ZII
Yokohama Advan Neova AD08 R
Yokohama ADVAN Neova
AD08 R


The BFGoodrich g-Force Rival, Dunlop Direzza ZII and Yokohama ADVAN Neova AD08 R were the top three tires and all provided crisp, immediate and linear steering response that really performed well through the five-cone slalom section of our test. Compared to these three, the Bridgestone Potenza RE-11A's steering response wasn't quite as crisp. Our opinions varied, however I like the predictability of both the BFGoodrich g-Force Rival and Yokohama ADVAN Neova AD08 R.

Our test writer had the difficult task of sorting through subjective assessments and data to anoint a winner. Our official results show the g-Force Rival taking first, the Dunlop Direzza ZII in second and Yokohama's AD08 R finishing third. Amongst those three, it's a photo finish when it comes to overall dry lap times as .22 seconds separated them.

If the BFGoodrich g-Force Rival isn't made in your vehicle's size, the Dunlop Direzza ZII and Yokohama ADVAN Neova AD08 R are both more than capable. The RE-11A is a worthy competitor that could use a little more dry traction, but overall it's a great Extreme Performance Sumer tire.

For complete test results, read "Testing Extreme Performance Summer Tires: The Boys of Summer Are Here."

Finding the Best Tires for Your Nissan Maxima

Thursday, July 25, 2013 by Colin .

Nissan's Maxima can take a variety of different tires from several performance categories. The first step to determining the best tires for your Maxima is to confirm the tire size. Next, you'll want to research and find what performance category fits what characteristics you desire in your new set of tires. Take a look at the following categories, along with some top choices in helping you determine the best tires for your Nissan.

While all options may not be available in your size, visit our Tire Decision Guide to help you determine the best tires for how and where you drive.

What are the Quietest Tires?

Friday, July 5, 2013 by Colin .

Are you looking for a quiet tire? Today's tire manufacturers know many drivers want something they can drive, not hear. That's why they spend many resources designing tires that try to minimize it. Take a look at some quiet options from a few popular performance categories.

Generally speaking, if a person stresses they want a tire that is quiet, I would direct them to a Grand Touring, Standard Touring or Passenger all-season tire. In the case of sport utility or truck tires, I would tell drivers to consider options in the Crossover/SUV Touring All-Season or Highway All-Season categories. Tires in these categories tend to prioritize low noise through optimizing their tread design.    

As an example, the Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus uses specially designed grooves to reduce acoustic tones. If you compare the Bridgestone to a Michelin Pilot Super Sport (Max Performance Summer) tire, you can see the tread design differences. The Michelin's focus is wet and dry traction, along with handling. It's designed to maximize those qualities at the expense of others, such as tread noise. Pilot Super Sports aren't noisy, but they won't be as quiet as a tire like the Turanza Serenity Plus.  

The same thing would apply to SUV and truck tires. An On-/Off-Road Commercial Traction tire, like the Goodyear Wrangler DuraTrac, with its large tread blocks and open spaces won't be as quiet as something like the Michelin LTX M/S2, which is part of the Highway All-Season category.


Bridgestone Turanza Serenity
Plus

Michelin Pilot Super
Sport

Goodyear Wrangler
DuraTrac


As tire technology improves, so do the products. Most modern tires have good road noise levels, therefore the differences between categories is getting narrower. An easy way to look at how different tires rate in their category is to look at our tire survey results. After selecting a category, you can sort by attributes, such as noise comfort, to help you decide which tire is best for you.  

Looking for a High Performance Tire with Some Track Capability? We Can Help!

Thursday, June 6, 2013 by Doc Horvath

For 2013, there's a great selection of new technology in the Extreme Performance Summer and Ultra High Performance Summer category. While we will be testing each newcomer this summer, we have already accumulated quite a bit of initial feedback and data indicates that this latest batch of tire offerings may turn out to be the best in some time!

BFGoodrich g-Force Rival and g-Force Sport COMP-2

With the g-Force Rival, BFGoodrich is setting a new performance standard for drivers that want ultimate grip at the track and a good blend of wet and dry traction on the street. Our introductory test provided an exciting taste of what we should see as summer progresses.

The g-Force Sport COMP 2 was released late last year and is positioned just one performance step below the Rival. It's aimed at drivers that'll take their car to the track and want that "racecar" feel. We have already tested this tire and it proved to be the class of the field. A combination of the g-Force Rival and g-Force Sport COMP-2 gives BFGoodrich a solid shot at being the hottest brand of the summer!

Bridgestone Potenza RE-11A

Building on the success of the Potenza RE-11, Bridgestone has added an exclusive tread compound to increase road contact and wear to the new Potenza RE-11A. While we have yet to test the Potenza RE-11A, its predecessor beat all contenders in our last test and we're expecting similar results from the new test.

Dunlop Direzza ZII

Like Bridgestone, Dunlop's had a real winner on their hands with the Direzza Sport Z1 Star Spec and we're looking to make a great tire even better. Introduced late last year, the Direzza ZII builds on the great reputation of the previous model by improving steering response and lateral grip. Read "Dunlop Direzza ZII Introductory Track Drive" to view our initial thoughts of the tire compared to the Z1 Star Spec.

Tire Rack Consumer Review of the Bridgestone Potenza RE-11

Monday, April 29, 2013 by Tire Rack Consumer Reviews

The following post was created from content submitted via Tire Rack's consumer surveys. Information shown is the opinion of the consumer and meant to be used for comparison shopping purposes.

Bridgestone Potenza RE-11 Reviewer's Overall Rating: 9.25
 
 

2001 BMW Z3 Coupe 3.0
More Tire Reviews for This Vehicle

 
Buy/More Info
Miles driven on tires: 2,000
Location: Nottingham, MD
Driving Condition: Spirited

Initial Review, 2,000 Miles on Tires
April 19, 2013

Good track tire if you can't or do not want to bring R compound tires to the track. Almost as good as old DOT type "R" compound tires. Drove 5 track days in a row at Barber Motorsports and was very satisfied with these tires. Wear on track was very good, with good communication and no loss of traction as they heated up towards the end of each session. A little understeer when compared to "R" compound tires. On the highway I was amazed at how civilized they were. Both comfort and noise level were great.

 

Tire Rack Consumer Review of the Continental ExtremeContact DW

Thursday, April 25, 2013 by Tire Rack Consumer Reviews

The following post was created from content submitted via Tire Rack's consumer surveys. Information shown is the opinion of the consumer and meant to be used for comparison shopping purposes.

Continental ExtremeContact DW Reviewer's Overall Rating: 9.5
 
 

2011 Nissan 370Z Coupe Touring
More Tire Reviews for This Vehicle

 
Buy/More Info
Miles driven on tires: 1,000
Location: Lynnwood, WA
Driving Condition: Spirited

Initial Review, 1,000 Miles on Tires
April 23, 2013

So these are my third set of Continentals having sworn off of Bridgestones and their miserable ride quality. The DWs when compared to the Contisports are a little down on dry grip. Not the end of the world as they give up grip in a very predictable and linear fashion unlike Bridgestone. Where these tires really seem to excel is in the wet, a huge benefit here in the North West. They ride soft, enough so that you'll find yourself checking tire pressures again, but they are awesome in their ability to soak up small imperfections. Overall terrific tires, cannot speak to longevity but they show little sings of wear in the first 1000 miles, and previous experience tells me that they will last fine.