Are Your Tires Worn Out?

Tuesday, November 15, 2011 by Alex Mouroulis
According to most states' laws, tires are legally worn out when they reach 2/32" of remaining tread depth. It's important to note that the tire's performance in rain and snow can be reduced before it no longer meets the minimum tread depth requirement.

You can substitute a tire tread depth gauge with a U.S. coin to measure those critical few 32nds of an inch of remaining tread depth. When placing a penny into several tread grooves across the tire, if part of Lincoln's head is always covered by the tread, you have more than 2/32" of tread depth remaining.
                                    
Measuring Tire Tread Depth with a Coin Measuring Tire Tread Depth with a Coin Measuring Tire Tread Depth with a Coin
It's been our experience that a tire's ability to handle water is greatly reduced below 4/32" of remaining tread depth. An easy way to measure this is by getting help from George Washington. When putting a quarter head size down in the tire's tread, if Washington's head is always covered, you have the necessary tread depth to navigate wet roads.
 
We believe that snow capability is greatly diminished when your tire's tread depth dwindles to approximately 6/32" of remaining tread depth. The rule of thumb on measuring this amount of tire tread is to once again use a penny. If after placing the penny into several grooves across the tire the Lincoln Monument is always covered by the tread, you have enough remaining tread to handle snow-covered roads. 

To gain a better understanding of how adequate tread can help you in different weather conditions, watch "Panic Stopping: How Much Tread Depth Do You Need?."

If the change in your pocket tells you it's time to look at tire websites for a new set, let us help you find the perfect match by shopping by vehicle.

Comments on Are Your Tires Worn Out?

Thursday, August 29, 2013 by Cal Burgin:
Very useful page. Thank you so much.
Saturday, December 14, 2013 by Mike Jones:
I am buying an front wheel drive car. The front tires are worn more than the back. Should I keep the most worn tires on the front or switch them with the new tires and thus have the best tires in the front?

Thanks
Mike

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